Exciting new collaborative project gets underway Exeter: A Place in Time

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archivesCotswold Archaeology and the Universities of Exeter and Reading, in partnership with Exeter City Council, have successfully applied to the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Historic England for funding for a major four-year project that will explore the relationship between the Roman and medieval city of Exeter and its rural hinterland. The work will be undertaken by the universities and Cotswold Archaeology, with Historic England, Exeter City Council and the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM) providing help in kind, and will also benefit from the input of specialists such as John Allan and Paul Bidwell.

The project will run from 2016-20 and will see several of the important excavations from the 1970s and 1980s written up, as well as a programme of radiocarbon dating and research into the pottery, animal bones, and metallurgical debris. The results will be published as a series of monographs in 2022, and other benefits will include the updating of the city’s historic environment record and of the museum’s displays and interpretative material.

This project follows on from the completion of the archiving of the pre-1990 Exeter sites at the Archaeology Data Service by Cotswold Archaeology, with funding from Historic England and in partnership with the city council. Selected previously hard to access Exeter Archaeology “green” reports and archive materials are now available on the ADS website. Also available are an interactive map of sites relating to the Legionary Fortress and the City defences and new introductions provided by Paul Bidwell and Stuart Blaylock. Also University of Exeter prepared a special webpage presenting the most important aspects of the project.

The project’s leads are Stephen Rippon (Archaeology Department, University of Exeter), Neil Holbrook (Cotswold Archaeology) and Gundula Müldner (Archaeology Department, University of Reading), with the involvement also of Andrew Pye (Exeter City Council) and colleagues from RAMM.